The Wonders of Garden Wildlife

If you ask a naturalist where they discovered their love for the natural world, some may say heathland or pristine ancient woodlands, however for me my love for the natural world started at home, in my garden.

My garden is my own patch that I can visit as often as I like and still discover new behaviours or species. The best thing about my garden is that it is just a typical garden, yet wildlife still thrives here. We generally don’t have outbreaks of ‘pest’ species and apart from pulling up ground elder and cleavers very little has to be done in order to keep the garden in shape. Aphids arrive on many plant species and instead of resorting to pesticides I just wait for the ladybirds to arrive, restoring a natural balance.

To date I have recorded 488 species in my garden in the last few years and this is likely to be the tip of the iceberg as some rather crazy people have just taken a square metre of their garden and found thousands of species there.

Here is a breakdown of the species I’ve seen in the garden in the last two years:

With urbanisation becoming a strong factor affecting our wildlife I wonder how many species will find refuge in residential gardens. You can make significant contributions to understanding which species live in gardens by taking part in the Garden Bioblitz this weekend. This aims to get people into their gardens and recording the wildlife they see in a 24 hour period. Every record counts and helps build a clearer picture of the trends occurring in our wildlife populations so why not get out there and find some wildlife this weekend!

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